theatlantic:

What It’s Like to Be Right About the Big Bang: Genesis of a Viral Video

Imagine that you have spent 30 years of your career working on a single project, dedicated to a single idea. Imagine that there have been doubters along the way. Imagine that you, yourself, have occasionally been unsure about whether it’s all worth it.

Imagine what it would feel like to find out that it is.

Now we know what that’s like—or, at least, we have a good idea. Yesterday, as part of the big announcement that the Big Bang’s “smoking gun” has been found, Stanford posted a video to YouTube. The brief production features the physicist Chao-Lin Kuo paying a visit to the home of his colleague, the fellow physicist Andrei Linde, to tell him that all his work had paid off: New evidence supports the cosmic inflation theory that Linde has been championing for decades. The theories he has honed and advocated are likely correct. He has, to be scientific about it, hit the jackpot.

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shortformblog:

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This man was given $25,000 to shoot an ad for The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty. Instead he spent all the money on disaster relief in the Philippines.

Impressive, and good on the studio for not turning him down.

(via tanya77)

"Be master of your petty annoyances and conserve your energies for the big, worthwhile things. It isn’t the mountain ahead that wears you out—it’s the grain of sand in your shoe."

— Robert Service (via trevorloy)


Akira Kurosawa and Toshio Mifune on the set of Red Beard (1965).

Akira Kurosawa and Toshio Mifune on the set of Red Beard (1965).

(Source: toshiromifunes, via hellabasic)

Rio: resort in the foreground, favela in the background, Christ the Redeemer in the distance watching over all.

Rio: resort in the foreground, favela in the background, Christ the Redeemer in the distance watching over all.

Tags: rio favela

trevorloy:

continuations:

When I was an entrepreneur raising money I tended to make a classic mistake: trying to convey all the amazing things we were doing in great detail. This is a terrible strategy. Why? Because too much detail buries the story of your business and also makes your business seem, well, complex. And…

Exactly right.  I often compare the entrepreneurial fundraising process to dating:  the only point of the first meeting is to evaluate whether you want to go on a second date.  Getting down into the weeds at the first meeting is akin to showing your date the last 10 years of your tax returns on the first date.  Tends not to work so well. ;-)

I imagine this goes both ways. The fundraiser reveals just enough to get the “second date” and learns enough from the funder to decide if there should be one.

"Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself."

— William Faulkner

"Play the game better if you’re winning. Change the rules of the game if you’re not."

— A.G. Lafley

You will not be asked to do the thing you do better. You will be asked to do the thing you and you alone can do.

It appears that, in my absence, some of the Tumblrs I’ve been following have gone off the rails.